Due to the current Corona Virus Pandemic, the observatory has suspended its operations until the end of September.  We apologize for any inconvenience this may have caused you. if conditions change we will update this notice.


Rocky Mountain National Park Astronomy Programs

Due to the current Corona Virus Pandemic, the Astronomy in the Park program has been suspended until next year.  We apologize for any inconvenience this may have caused you.

Rocky Mountain National Park Astronomy Link

events-RMNPObserve the night sky with the help of a park ranger and expert volunteer astronomers. Rocky Mountain National Park offers weekly Astronomy in the Park programs from June through August. A traditional astronomy program is conducted in Upper Beaver Meadows every other week and includes a 20 to 30 minute interpretive presentation by park rangers followed by a night of observing put on by local astronomers and park volunteers. Dress warm, bring binoculars and a flashlight, and meet at the Upper Beaver Meadows Trail-head parking area.


This Months EPMO & EVAS  Astronomy Lecture

The Estes Park Memorial Observatory (EPMO) in conjunction with the Estes Valley Astronomical Society (EVAS) hold a joint meeting every month that features a lecture on an astronomy topic followed by a viewing session. The meetings start at 7:PM and open with a short discussion of current EVAS business. A short presentation about a star currently visible in the night sky precedes the formal lecture for the evening. Invited speakers who work in the field of astronomy or aerospace generally give the lectures.

StarNightMeeting


Estes Park Clear Sky Chart


Estes Park Sky Map (SkyMaps.com)

What’s Up for August 2020 From NASA JPL

The Skies over Longmont August 2020 by John Ensworth

Aug
10
Sat
Public Star Night Open to All – FREE @ Observatory OPEN HOUSE
Aug 10 all-day

 

The public Star Nights are conducted by volunteers of the observatory and are free and open to all. It starts around Sunset and continues until the last visitor leaves. We generally have a couple of volunteers man telescopes setup around the outside of the building. The outside telescopes include two big (10″ and 22″) Dobsonian telescopes and a 5 inch Vixen binocular telescope. We will also be using the computerized 16″ RC telescope in the automated dome. Usually each telescope is focused on an astronomical object and The guest move from one telescope to another throughout the night.

The Public Star Nights for 2019 are:

Saturday, June 8th, 2019, 8:30 pm
Saturday, June 29th, 2019, 8:30 pm
Saturday, July 13th, 2019, 8:30 pm
Saturday, August 10th, 2019, 8:30 pm
Saturday, September 7th, 2019, 8:00 pm

Aug
24
Sat
August 24th Observatory Open House / Lecture /Public Star Night @ Observatory OPEN HOUSE
Aug 24 all-day

Public open house/Lecture

“Space Race 2019: China, Israel, & India on the Moon”

The Estes Valley Astronomical Society (EVAS) in conjunction with The Estes Park Memorial Observatory is offering a free public open house/lecture on Saturday, August 24 at 7 PM.  The goal of EVAS is to promote amateur astronomy and education in the Estes valley

China’s Yutu2 Rover on the Moon Credit Spacenews

While the United States plans to return to lunar exploration in the next few years, China’sYutu-2 rover is already there, Israel pioneered its Beresheet mission, and India will land the Chandrayaan-2 rover on Earth’s Moon in early September.  Let’s review lunar science basics and look ahead to America’s Moon2Mars and Artemis missions.  This illustrated presentation is intended for a general audience.

 

Suzanne Metlay

Dr. Suzanne Metlay Geoscience Professor

Suzanne Metlay is full-time faculty in Geoscience Teacher Education at Western Governors University, a fully online non-profit university founded in 1997 by 19 governors of western states,’ including Colorado. Previously, Suzanne taught astronomy and geology at Front Range Community College in Longmont and Fort Collins, was Operations Director for Secure World Foundation in Superior, and served as Education Programs Manager at CU-Boulder’s Fiske Planetarium. Currently, Suzanne is President of the Teacher Education Division of the National Association of Geoscience Teachers.

 

Suzanne has a BA in History. and Science from Harvard University and a PhD in Geology and Planetary Science from the University of Pittsburgh. She was awarded the Antarctica Service Medal from the Department of the Navy and National Science Foundation for fieldwork conducted as a participant in the Antarctic Search for Meteorites (ANSMET) in 1991.

 

The observatory is just north of the high school at 1600 Manford Ave. Park in the teacher’s parking lot adjacent to the observatory. The doors will open at 7:00pm and the meeting will start at 7:30pm.  The presentation, including a question and answer period, lasts about an hour.  After the presentation, weather permitting, we will look through the 16 inch dome telescope at various celestial objects.

 

The lecture is free to the public and no reservations necessary. Just come and join the party and be ready to ask questions!  For more information, please call the observatory at 970-586-5668

 

Sep
7
Sat
CLOSED SCOTTISH FESTIVAL @ Observatory OPEN HOUSE
Sep 7 all-day
Sep
28
Sat
September 28th Observatory Open House / Lecture /Public Star Night @ Observatory OPEN HOUSE
Sep 28 all-day

Tonight’s Program TBD

 

“The Square Kilometer Array – An Update”

The Estes Valley Astronomical Society (EVAS) in conjunction with The Estes Park Memorial Observatory is offering a free public open house/lecture on Saturday, September 28 at 7 PM. The goal of EVAS is to promote amateur astronomy and education in the Estes valley. Our guest speaker is Dr Dayton Jones, from the Space Science Institute in Boulder, and the title of his presentation is “The Square Kilometer Array – An Update”.

For over twenty years the international radio astronomy community has been developing the technology and designs for a revolutionary new research instrument, the Square Kilometer Array (SKA). The SKA will be the next-generation facility for radio astronomy, offering a tremendous increase in sensitivity and flexibility over any existing radio facility in the world. These new capabilities will help answer some of the most fundamental questions in astrophysics, including the formation of nearby planetary systems, tests of gravitational theories in the strong-field limit, and the long-term evolution and fate of our universe.

Artist’s impression of the 5 km diameter central core of Square Kilometer Array (SKA) antennas

.

 

Black Hole

Radio Image of the Black Hole in Galaxy M87

The United States is not a formal partner in the SKA, but is proposing a US- based array called the Next Generation Very Large Array (ngVLA). This facility will cover higher frequencies than the SKA, and thus will provide complementary scientific capabilities. Together, these arrays will provide an unprecedented leap in observational capabilities.

This talk will summarize the current status of the SKA and ngVLA, and some of the innovative technology developments underway.

Dayton Jones worked at Caltech’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California for over thirty years, retiring as a Principal Scientist and moving to Colorado last year. He is currently a Senior Research Scientist at the Space Science Institute in Boulder. His research interests have focused on high-resolution imaging and position measurements of distant radio sources using interferometry. He has served as an officer of the US SKA Consortium and a US representative to the international SKA Science and Engineering Council.

The observatory is just north of the high school at 1600 Manford Ave. Park in the teacher’s parking lot adjacent to the observatory. The doors will open at 7:00pm and the meeting will start at 7:30pm. The presentation, including a question and answer period, lasts about an hour. After the presentation, weather permitting, we will look through the 16 inch dome telescope at various celestial objects.

The lecture is free to the public and no reservations necessary. Just come and join the party and be ready to ask questions! For more information, please call the observatory at 970-586-5668

Nov
23
Sat
November Observatory Open House / EVAS Meeting @ Observatory OPEN HOUSE
Nov 23 all-day

Tonight’s Program TBD

 

The Estes Valley Astronomical Society (EVAS) in conjunction with The Estes Park Memorial Observatory is offering a free public open house/ EVAS meeting. The goal of EVAS is to promote amateur astronomy and education in the Estes valley.

The observatory is just north of the high school at 1600 Manford Ave. Park in the teacher’s parking lot adjacent to the observatory. The doors will open at 7:00 pm and the meeting will start at 7:30 pm. After the meeting, weather permitting, we will look through the new 16 inch dome telescope at various celestial objects.

If you have any questions, please check the EPMO web site at: www.AngelsAbove.org or call the observatory at 970-586-5668

Dec
21
Sat
December 21st Observatory Open House / Lecture /Public Star Night @ Observatory OPEN HOUSE
Dec 21 all-day

 

Reality – How science and theology can never get along.  How science and theology can get along.

Presented by John Ensworth

 

This talk is an introduction to the topics covered in the upcoming book “Reality” (which will hit bookshelves and downloads late 2020 under the Covenant Publishing label) by John Ensworth. Public feedback and discussion is strongly encouraged at the end of the presentation.

“Reality” is an investigation of the world around you and inside you; seen and unseen. It explores the internal concept of reality you experience, the real-world reality around you, and the place of the supernatural reality that is the subject of many Christian sermons.

You will see reality from two very different points of view; that of the scientist and that of the theologian. It is an exploration of the firewall that separates those two approaches to explaining and describing reality.

In “Reality” you’ll explore how randomness is the ultimate limit of understanding in science and should be regarded as holy to the theologian.  This randomness also extends to how change over time comes about and how biological evolution is the special theory of evolution; in fact, everything changes over time via evolution.

John Ensworth

John Ensworth is currently the Principal Investigator of the NASA SMD Independent Education Product Review at the IGES, which is a non-profit organization formed, in part, to conduct independent reviews on all Earth and space science education products produced by or created for NASA . His position is the one responsible for conducting these reviews and helping with NASA education and outreach efforts through the Web and at large education conferences (i.e. NSTA, NCTM, and the ASP) that introduce the products that are scientifically accurate and appropriate for the educational audience they are intended for. In the 90’s Mr. Ensworth was a masters’ student and a PhD candidate in meteorology at the University of Oklahoma. He teaches physics and mathematics at a number of online universities. He earned undergraduate degrees in physics and astronomy, and geography and meteorology with an emphasis in math and computer science. You can view a Webcam of his backyard observatory (Cherrywood Observatory) in Longmont

The observatory is just north of the high school at 1600 Manford Ave. Park in the teacher’s parking lot adjacent to the observatory. The doors will open at 7:00 pm and the meeting will start at 7:30 pm. The presentation, including a question and answer period, lasts about an hour. After the presentation, weather permitting, we will look through the 16 inch dome telescope at various celestial objects.

The lecture is free to the public and no reservations necessary. Just come and join the party and be ready to ask questions! For more information, please call the observatory at 970-586-5668

Jan
18
Sat
January 18th Observatory Open House / Lecture /Public Star Night @ Observatory OPEN HOUSE
Jan 18 all-day

 

Reality Conclusion – How science and theology can never get along.  How science and theology can get along.

Presented by John Ensworth

 

This talk is part 2 of 2  of an introduction to the topics covered in the upcoming book “Reality” (which will hit bookshelves and downloads late 2020 under the Covenant Publishing label) by John Ensworth. Public feedback and discussion is strongly encouraged at the end of the presentation.

“Reality” is an investigation of the world around you and inside you; seen and unseen. It explores the internal concept of reality you experience, the real-world reality around you, and the place of the supernatural reality that is the subject of many Christian sermons.

You will see reality from two very different points of view; that of the scientist and that of the theologian. It is an exploration of the firewall that separates those two approaches to explaining and describing reality.

In “Reality” you’ll explore how randomness is the ultimate limit of understanding in science and should be regarded as holy to the theologian.  This randomness also extends to how change over time comes about and how biological evolution is the special theory of evolution; in fact, everything changes over time via evolution.

John Ensworth

John Ensworth is currently the Principal Investigator of the NASA SMD Independent Education Product Review at the IGES, which is a non-profit organization formed, in part, to conduct independent reviews on all Earth and space science education products produced by or created for NASA . His position is the one responsible for conducting these reviews and helping with NASA education and outreach efforts through the Web and at large education conferences (i.e. NSTA, NCTM, and the ASP) that introduce the products that are scientifically accurate and appropriate for the educational audience they are intended for. In the 90’s Mr. Ensworth was a masters’ student and a PhD candidate in meteorology at the University of Oklahoma. He teaches physics and mathematics at a number of online universities. He earned undergraduate degrees in physics and astronomy, and geography and meteorology with an emphasis in math and computer science. You can view a Webcam of his backyard observatory (Cherrywood Observatory) in Longmont

The observatory is just north of the high school at 1600 Manford Ave. Park in the teacher’s parking lot adjacent to the observatory. The doors will open at 7:00 pm and the meeting will start at 7:30 pm. The presentation, including a question and answer period, lasts about an hour. After the presentation, weather permitting, we will look through the 16 inch dome telescope at various celestial objects.

The lecture is free to the public and no reservations necessary. Just come and join the party and be ready to ask questions! For more information, please call the observatory at 970-586-5668

Feb
22
Sat
February 22nd Observatory Open House / Lecture /EVAS Meeting @ Observatory OPEN HOUSE
Feb 22 @ 7:00 pm – 10:00 pm

EVAS Meeting /Open House – Saturday, February 22nd, 2020
Doors Open: 7:00 | Guest Speaker: 7:30-8:30 | Observing: 8:30-10:00

Dark Skies Matter”

By
Deborah Price and Rebecca Dickson

 

Light pollution blots out much of our night sky and prevents us from seeing the views that our ancestors enjoyed, but there are also other reasons to protect the night sky. More than half of wildlife species depend on darkness to survive, and a lack of light is important for human health.

Deborah Price, Natural History Program Specialist with Boulder County Parks & Open Space, and Rebecca Dickson, chair of the Sierra Club-Indian Peaks, will share why dark skies matter, what Boulder County is doing to monitor dark skies on open space and  in urban areas, and what we can all do to help preserve darkness now and for the future. Brochures and information from the International Dark-Sky Association will be available for attendees.

Photo by Mike Lohr, Rabbit Mountain Open Space

Photo by Mike Lohr, Rabbit Mountain Open Space

Deborah Price has coordinated a dark sky monitoring project for Boulder County Parks & Open Space the past five years. The project is done in conjunction with other open space agencies along the Front Range. She is passionate about preserving dark skies, and likes the reminder it provides us that we are part of something much larger than just the earth. Deborah also coordinates astronomy programs for Boulder County.

Rebecca Dickson is the chair of the Sierra Club-Indian Peaks Group in Boulder County. She works to understand light pollution’s damaging effects on animals, insects, and humans and helps share that information with others. She has put on joint presentations with CU Boulder’s Fiske Planetarium and the International Dark-Sky Association on the dangers of light pollution and the wonders of a starry night sky.

The observatory is just north of the high school at 1600 Manford Ave. Park in the teacher’s parking lot adjacent to the observatory. The doors will open at 7:00 pm and the meeting will start at 7:30 pm.  The presentation, including a question and answer period, lasts about an hour.  After the presentation, weather permitting, we will look through the 16 inch dome telescope at various celestial objects.

The lecture is free to the public and no reservations necessary. Just come and join the party and be ready to ask questions!  For more information, please call the observatory at 970-586-5668

Jun
13
Sat
Public Star Night Open to All – FREE @ Observatory OPEN HOUSE
Jun 13 all-day

 

The public Star Nights are conducted by volunteers of the observatory and are free and open to all. It starts around Sunset and continues until the last visitor leaves. We generally have a couple of volunteers man telescopes setup around the outside of the building. The outside telescopes include two big (10″ and 22″) Dobsonian telescopes and a 5 inch Vixen binocular telescope. We will also be using the computerized 16″ RC telescope in the automated dome. Usually each telescope is focused on an astronomical object and The guest move from one telescope to another throughout the night.

The Open Viewing Nights for 2020 are:

  • Saturday,  June 13th, 2020, 8:30 pm
  • Saturday, June 27th, 2020, 8:30 pm
  • Saturday, July 11th, 2020, 8:30 pm
  • Saturday,  August 22nd, 2020, 8:30 pm

 

Jun
27
Sat
Public Star Night Open to All – FREE @ Observatory OPEN HOUSE
Jun 27 all-day

 

The public Star Nights are conducted by volunteers of the observatory and are free and open to all. It starts around Sunset and continues until the last visitor leaves. We generally have a couple of volunteers man telescopes setup around the outside of the building. The outside telescopes include two big (10″ and 22″) Dobsonian telescopes and a 5 inch Vixen binocular telescope. We will also be using the computerized 16″ RC telescope in the automated dome. Usually each telescope is focused on an astronomical object and The guest move from one telescope to another throughout the night.

The Open Viewing Nights for 2020 are:

  • Saturday,  June 13th, 2020, 8:30 pm
  • Saturday, June 27th, 2020, 8:30 pm
  • Saturday, July 11th, 2020, 8:30 pm
  • Saturday,  August 22nd, 2020, 8:30 pm